Art

With its origins in 16th-century India, Bharathanatyam remains hugely popular. Here’s a primer to kickstart your enjoyment I watch spellbound when, with just a flick of her fingers and a gleam in her eye, my teacher transforms from an impish five-year-old one moment to a spiteful snake in the next, to a lovelorn maiden in
0 Comments
February 12 marks the 100th birthday of Rhapsody in Blue. Via NPR, the daily newsmagazine “1A” is re-airing my “Gershwin Moment” documentary from last February; it highlights my favorite Rhapsody in Blue recording, by Alexander Tsfasman and Gennadi Rozhdestvensky (Moscow, 1960). And I’m taking part in additional Gershwin radio features on NPR and BBC-3. As the pianist Benjamin Pasternack once had occasion
0 Comments
Photo: Liz Parkinson/Netflix This article originally appeared in Gold Rush, a subscriber-only newsletter about the perpetual Hollywood awards race. It’s a quiet week on the Oscar front, as the circus took a break to let the Grammys have their moment. So let’s take stock of what’s habitually the most dramatic of the four acting races: Best Actress!
0 Comments
It’s a trap to review the movie a filmmaker didn’t make. A difficult temptation as it turns out with Bradley Cooper’s Maestro, the director/writer/actor’s passion project about Leonard Bernstein. Maestro isn’t really a movie about Leonard Bernstein or his career, or even about music per se. It’s not really a “biopic,” in the traditional Hollywood
0 Comments
                                               For Tomas and Lilian A face long unloved will at some point grow ugly,As unkissed features untended will as with an unkemptGarden grow wild, as it is with my face and as it is With my garden, which under my mother’s careWas well tended back before when her life’s strong argued caseBecame filed. Sadly for
0 Comments
Tattle Life, an anonymous gossip forum, has been described as “the most toxic place on the internet”. “Fake boobs, fake teeth, fake nose, fake life”, “Career is down the drain; she’s still so vain!” and “Always the wedding guest but never the bride” are just a selection of the thread titles on the site. People
0 Comments
Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei—whose gallery delayed his show after he tweeted about the Israel-Hamas war—said recently that censorship in the West poses a “greater threat” due to how it “operates in a more concealed, solid and enduring manner.” The comments were made to the Art Newspaper this week followed an interview with Sky
0 Comments
Screens are replacing paper when it comes to nearly every aspect of communication, but is it good for our mental health? Research proves the countless mental health benefits of reading, but still most people are choosing screen-time over picking up a book when it comes to entertainment. Even in schools, gone are the days of
0 Comments
Ten years ago, I stopped writing lyric poetry. I had a couple of slim, well-received collections to my name, and my poetry occasionally appeared in a magazine with pedigree, like Poetry. One time, an editor at The New Yorker even mailed a personalized, encouraging rejection on letterhead. (They rebuffed poems by paper in the good
0 Comments
Listen to this article 00:00 15:50 Produced by ElevenLabs and NOA, News Over Audio, using AI narration. “I would not say that my art is dark,” Milo Rau tells me, and I burst out laughing. We are sitting in the office space of his theater in Ghent, Belgium, surrounded by posters of his work. In
0 Comments
A dazzling array of classical music prevailed at the 66th Grammy Awards, reflecting a contemporary field that honors the canon even as it elevates new voices. Among the winners were Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, who took Best Orchestral Performance for Thomas Adès: Dante; and Nils Schweckendiek with Uusinta Ensemble and the Helsinki
0 Comments
In Brief | Composer and conductor John Williams is one of the most respected and beloved figures in music. He reflects with League President and CEO Simon Woods on the beginnings of his career, a lifetime in music, and his love for orchestras. 25 Grammy Awards. Five Oscars. Four Golden Globes. A record-breaking 54 Oscar
0 Comments
[Above: Boston’s Symphony Hall, built by Henry Higginson and opened in 1900.] Last week I heard the Boston Symphony perform Shostakovich’s Lady Macbeth at Carnegie Hall. The conductor was their music director since 2014: Andris Nelsons. I had planned to write a blog but instead emailed my impressions to a dozen friends in the music business. The
0 Comments
Amazon’s Audible is feeling the heat as Spotify, the music streaming giant, takes a giant leap into the ever-expanding world of audiobooks. The concerns were unveiled during an internal all-hands meeting this week, where Audible CEO Bob Carrigan addressed employee inquiries about the company’s focus on competition rather than customer needs, according to a recording
0 Comments